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Crown of Midnight. [22 Nov 2013|08:33am]

goodtomatopie
[ mood | awake ]

Hello people!

Yes so, I'm going to say my opinion about a book. This has never happened before... I think. well well.

So I have read ''Crown of Midnight''(sorry if I spell wrong) by Sarah J.Maas. She's an amazing writer, just amazing. This book is the second in a series(Ido not know how many it will be, 3?). I love her books(have only read 2) and she is the author that made me love to read. I really, really hated to read before her books!

I don't want to spoil anyone that haven't read the books and maybe want to after my little post(I hope somebody those).

Lets talk about the ending first(i know bad idea). I loved, hated, and cried at the ending. OMG! It was so beautiful, nail-biting, sad, horrible and why the **** isn't the next book out yet?! I need it NOW.
I got put of track there sorry... sorry. Well back to the point, the ending was really unexpected for me but a really good ending because you now want to read the next book... cliffhanger.(a big one)

All the things you want to happen after you read the first book happens and almost all the things you don't want to happen do to.

She's a amazing writer, you get dragged in to the story at the first page. and you are with it to the end. I love Sarah's books and how she writes. I could easily get a picture it my head when she describe all from feelings, surroundings to people. toy really are a part of the story when you read it.

I really recommend the books for anyone that like fantasy, mystery, a little bit of horror to romance.

Anna

(the first book ''Throne of Glass'')

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"The Wars of Light and Shadow" by Janny Wurtz [27 Jul 2013|06:35pm]

momsalive1
I read the first book in the series, "the Curse of the Mistwraith" and started on the second, "The Ships of Merior".  I like the way she writes, I like a long series with big fat books that has a definite ending (8 books so far I think, with one more planned), and she has set up an interesting world,  However, as of 50 or so pages into the second book I am ready to throw in the towel.

I was somewhat annoyed in the first book by odd character behavior, and it looks like this problem may ruin this book.  Already three main characters are interacting in ways that make no sense to me.  A character who has done little but drink, be a pain in the ass and provide dubious comic relief for the previous 700+ pages is given the important task of finding and protecting another character.  Why?  Because he pulled a prank and his supervisor got mad and decided it would be amusing for these two to interact because they hate each other.  WTF?!?!

So has anyone read this series?  Did you fInd this a problem?  Can you explain this plot twist to me, or at least tell me it gets better?
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The Queen of the Dawn Part VI [13 Mar 2013|10:12pm]

claremonty

This story was inspired by Arthurian legends and other medieval European folklore, "Tithonus" (1859), a poem by the Victorian poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson, as well as the ancient Greek myth about Eos, the goddess of the dawn who loved the mortal Prince Tithonus of Troy, plus my addiction to George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire and HBO's Game of Thrones. Hope you like it. :)

Rating:
15+ for violence and sexual situations.

Story Summary:
Cursed by the Queen of the Dawn with impossible desire, Prince Hal will risk the most precious thing of all, his honor, on a quest to find the edge of the world and the secret of immortality.

Excerpt:
Multiplied flickers spun like comets in the hot quavering atmosphere. The faceted ceiling, which was higher than the rafters of the tallest turret of his father’s castle, glittered like the inside of a diamond. At its domed apex the star-filled indigo evening shimmered through a fluid crystal disk.

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Interesting fantasy/sci-fi infographics (in Enhlish and in Russian) [16 Mar 2013|11:22pm]

ninaflaca
http://3droid.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/SFSignalNPR100Flowchart.jpg
http://inoyakaigor.ru/pict/1346629160856.png
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The Queen of the Dawn Part V [08 Mar 2013|09:35pm]

claremonty

This story was inspired by Arthurian legends and other medieval European folklore, "Tithonus" (1859), a poem by the Victorian poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson, as well as the ancient Greek myth about Eos, the goddess of the dawn who loved the mortal Prince Tithonus of Troy, plus my addiction to George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire and HBO's Game of Thrones. Hope you like it. :)

Rating:
15+ for violence and sexual situations.

Story Summary:
Cursed by the Queen of the Dawn with impossible desire, Prince Hal will risk the most precious thing of all, his honor, on a quest to find the edge of the world and the secret of immortality.

Excerpt:
“Your hands and arms were burned.” Her forehead was not visible yet he sensed her brow tighten. “You may never wield a sword again.”

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The Queen of the Dawn Part IV [07 Mar 2013|12:35am]

claremonty

This story was inspired by Arthurian legends and other medieval European folklore, "Tithonus" (1859), a poem by the Victorian poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson, as well as the ancient Greek myth about Eos, the goddess of the dawn who loved the mortal Prince Tithonus of Troy, plus my addiction to George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire and HBO's Game of Thrones. Hope you like it. :)

Rating:
15+ for violence and sexual situations.

Story Summary:
Cursed by the Queen of the Dawn with impossible desire, Prince Hal will risk the most precious thing of all, his honor, on a quest to find the edge of the world and the secret of immortality.

Excerpt:
A powerful gust raked his hair and chilled his neck. Shearing sounds that conjured broad sails rippling in a torrential squall grew in the distance. “Dragon wings,” he murmured, sliding his arm into the grip of the shield.

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The Queen of the Dawn Part I [01 Mar 2013|02:34am]

dielectricity

Hello:

I just posted Part I of a new original fic called The Queen of the Dawn.

It's a scary fairy tale inspired by Arthurian legends and other medieval European folklore, the poem "Tithonus" (1859) by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, as well as the ancient greek myth about the goddess of the dawn, Eos, and her mortal lover Prince Tithonus of Troy, and my addiction to George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire and HBO's Game of Thrones. (Can't wait for Season 3!)

Here's an excerpt:

“The strike will not kill you.” The vicious beauty of the Queen’s stare and the rending music of her voice sharpened the pain. The prince felt his chest splitting apart. “You will fill with longing for what you cannot have,” she intoned. “You shall have no rest, no succor, until you enter our realm that drifts off the edge of the world.”

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Shadowmarch by Tad Williams [08 Jan 2013|09:21pm]

momsalive1
I got all four of these books for Christmas, and blew through them.  Excellent, though the last one felt as if it was hurried into print (things a once-over should have caught, like an event occurs where you know someone is not present, and that someone later reports on the event as if they were there, someone spreads out a map on their lap when they are standing, etc...).  I'm wondering now about his other series and how they compare to this one - any thoughts? 
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Review: The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien [29 Dec 2012|03:37pm]

ed_rex

Return to Middle Earth: The Hobbit

Believe it or not, Peter Jackson's latest film is only indirectly responsible for my decision to re-read The Hobbit (again). The proximal cause was Tor.com's (no-doubt entirely commercial) decision to ask the redoubtable Kate Nepveu to lead a weekly, chapter-by-chapter "re-read" of the novel in conjunction with the release of the first (of three!) movies based on J.R.R. Tolkien's 300 page children's story.

My intention had been to follow along at Nepveu's chapter-a-week pace and, perhaps, to contribute to the ongoing conversation she was (and is!) sure to inspire, but Tolkien's deceptively simple prose and thematically complex fairy story swept me away (as it has a number of times before). I finished the book in a couple of days.

The short version is that The Hobbit remains a delightful adventure story and fairy tale, even if it is the work of a writer who has yet to reach the full extent of his creative powers.

That said, it also a very strange book, that strays very far indeed from a typical heroic path in favour of wandering the fields of moral complexity and (relatively) complex characterizations. The protagonists are far from perfect and even the villains show surprising signs of humanity.

A lovely book to read aloud to a child, there is every chance that you will have to read it twice, since you'll likely treat yourself to the whole thing before you sit down for Chapter Two with said youngster.

The long version lives on my site. (As usual, there are spoilers.)

_______

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The Chaos: Nalo Hopkinson's nightmare of Blackness [07 Oct 2012|04:07pm]

ed_rex
Edited to disable auto-formatting.Drawing on myths from Jamaica to Russia, on folk tales of Coyote and Brer Rabbit, and maybe from sources as disparate as Chuck Jones, J.R.R. Tolkien and Mervyn Peake (not to mention Lewis Carroll), Nalo Hopkinson's "Young Adult" debut is as singular a creation as it has been my pleasure to read in a very long time.</p>

All at once a surreal adventure, a subtle exploration of privilege in caste-ridden society and a daring push against the walls of narrative fiction itself, The Chaos has no villain and its (black, Canadian) heroine never wields a blade nor fires a gun.

Though questions of race and identify form organic parts of how the novel's characters view and interact with the world (none of the book's major characters is white), race is not what the book is about. Hopkinson is telling a story, she is not preaching.

Narrated by probably the most fully-realized teenager I have come across in fiction, The Chaos is always surprising, a thoroughly unconventional page-turner you owe it to yourself to read — to pass on to any literate young person you know.

For my full review, click, "When I cried, the tears were black."

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September Review Round-Up [30 Sep 2012|06:54pm]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during September. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in September, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) James S.A. Corey, Caliban's War: Excellent
2) Jim C. Hines, Red Hood's Revenge: Worth Reading, with Reservations
3) Matt Forbeck, Amortals: It's a Gamble
4) Daniel Abraham: The Dragon's Path: It's a Gamble
5) Ann Aguirre: Endgame: Good Read
6) Pearl North: The Book of the Night: Good Read
7) James S.A. Corey: Gods of Risk: An Expanse Novella: Good Read
8) Alison Goodman: Eon: Good Read


As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
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July Review Round-Up [04 Aug 2012|11:37am]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during July. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in July, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) Ken Liu: The Man Who Ended History: Excellent
2) Heidi Ruby Miller: Ambasadora: No Rating
3) Leigh Bardugo: Shadow and Bone: Worth Reading, with Reservations
4) Elizabeth Wein: Code Name Verity: My Precious
5) Grant Morrison: WE3: The Deluxe Edition: Worth Reading, with Reservations
6) Mira Grant: Apocalypse Scenario #683: The Box: Good Read
7) James S.A. Corey: Leviathan Wakes: Couldn't Put It Down
8) Mira Grant: San Diego 2014: The Last Stand of the California Browncoats: Good Read
9) Bill Willingham: Fables: Deluxe Edition: Book 5: Good Read
10) Jo Walton: Among Others: Worth Reading, with Reservations
11) Stina Leicht: Of Blood and Honey: Worth Reading, with Reservations
12) Rae Carson: The Shadow Cats: Good Read
13) Cherie Priest: Ganymede: Good Read

As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
2 comments|post comment

April Review Round-Up [06 May 2012|09:22am]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during April. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in April, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) Elizabeth Bear: Grail: Worth Reading, with Reservations
2) Maggie Stiefvater: The Scorpio Races: Excellent
3) Bill Willingham: Fables: Deluxe Edition: Book 1: Good Read
4) Sean Stewart: Mockingbird: Couldn't Put It Down
5) Patricia Briggs: River Marked: Good Read
6) Octavia E. Butler: Bloodchild and Other Stories: Couldn't Put It Down
7) John Green: The Fault in Our Stars: Couldn't Put It Down
8) Bill Willingham: Fables: Deluxe Edition: Book 2: Couldn't Put It Down
9) Kenneth Oppel: This Dark Endeavor: It's a Gamble
10) Lois McMaster Bujold: Paladin of Souls: Couldn't Put It Down
11) Ann Aguirre: Devil's Punch: Good Read
12) Bill Willingham: Fables: Deluxe Edition: Book 3: Good Read
13) Kit Whitfiled: In Great Waters: Good Read

As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
2 comments|post comment

March Review Round-Up [01 Apr 2012|04:29pm]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during March. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in March, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) Grant Morrison: Joe the Barbarian: Couldn't Put It Down
2) Mark Budz: Idolon: Worth Reading, with Reservations
3) Maria V. Snyder: Touch of Power: Worth Reading, with Reservations
4) Gail Carriger: Timeless: Couldn't Put It Down
5) Rebecca Guay: A Flight of Angels: Good Read
6) Elizabeth Bear: Chill: Worth Reading, with Reservations
7) Martha Wells: The Cloud Roads: Good Read
8) Margo Lanagan: Black Juice: Worth Reading, with Reservations
9) Seanan McGuire: Discount Armageddon: Couldn't Put It Down
10) Rick Yancey: The Monstrumologist: Good Read
11) Nick Spencer: Morning Glories: Deluxe Collection: Volume 1: Couldn't Put It Down

As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
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January Review Round-Up [05 Feb 2012|01:36am]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during January. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in January, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) Catherynne M. Valente: The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making: Excellent
2) Julie Cross: Tempest: Not My Cup of Tea (DNF)
3) Rae Carson: The Girl of Fire and Thorns: Couldn't Put It Down
4) Susan Cooper: The Grey King: Good Read
5) Catherynne M. Valente: The Girl Who Ruled Fairyland -- For a Little While: Excellent
6) Melissa Meyer: Glitches: Worth Reading, with Reservations
7) Meghan McCarron: Swift, Brutal Retaliation: Good Read
8) Sabrina Benulis: Archon: Problematic, but Promising (DNF)
9) Melissa Scott: Shadow Man: Worth Reading, with Reservations
10) M.L.N. Hanover: Killing Rites: Good Read
11) Susan Cooper: Silver on the Tree: Worth Reading, with Reservations
12) Ilona Andrews: Magic Gifts: Worth Reading, with Reservations
13) Robert Charles Wilson: Darwinia: Worth Reading, with Reservations

As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
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December Review Round-Up [03 Jan 2012|07:57pm]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during December. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in December, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) Ransom Riggs: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children: Couldn't Put It Down
2) Catherynne M. Valente: Silently and Very Fast: Excellent
3) Susan Cooper: Over Sea, Under Stone: Worth Reading, with Reservations
4) Karen Traviss: Ally: Good Read
5) Nalo Hopkinson: The New Moon's Arms: Good Read
6) Susan Cooper: The Dark is Rising: Worth Reading, with Reservations
7) Karen Traviss: Judge: Worth Reading, with Reservations
8) Lee Bermejo: Batman: Noel: Good Read
9) Amanda Hocking: Switched: It's a Gamble
10) Susan Cooper: Greenwitch: Good Read

As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
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November Review Round-Up [11 Dec 2011|04:41pm]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during November. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in November, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) George R.R. Martin: Fevre Dream: Good Read
2) Brandon Sanderson: Elantris: Good Read
3) Melissa Marr: Graveminder: Below Standard
4) Alex Bledsoe: The Hum and the Shiver: Worth Reading, with Reservations
5) Laini Taylor: Daughter of Smoke & Bone: Couldn't Put It Down
6) Sam Cameron: Mystery of the Tempest: A Fisher Key Adventure: Worth Reading, with Reservations
7) Susanna Clarke: Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell: Not My Cup of Tea (DNF)
8) N.K. Jemisin: The Kingdom of Gods: Good Read
9) Richard Kadrey: Aloha from Hell: Good Read
10) Carrie Vaughn: Straying from the Path: Couldn't Put It Down

As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
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[29 Nov 2011|02:34am]

sakuraberries
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern is such a new book that I'm pretty sure most people haven't even heard of it yet. The only reason I'm currently reading it is because Erin Morgenstern gave a NaNoWriMo pep talk that I read. When she said her book made use of a circus, I was immediately hooked. But the book is so much more than just a circus. The book is magic and illusion and wonder and hyperelegance and unbearable beauty. It's truly one of the most amazing books I have come across in a long time.

Summary, from Morgenstern's website: The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway—a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them, this is a game in which only one can be left standing, and the circus is but the stage for a remarkable battle of imagination and will.

Despite themselves, however, Celia and Marco tumble headfirst into love—a deep, magical love that makes the lights flicker and the room grow warm whenever they so much as brush hands. True love or not, the game must play out, and the fates of everyone involved, from the cast of extraordinary circus per­formers to the patrons, hang in the balance, suspended as precariously as the daring acrobats overhead.


Recommending this book is only one reason I make this post - the other reason is I recently created a community for it, called thenightcircus, and I would love to find other LJ members who have read and enjoyed this book. Join if that's you!
1 comment|post comment

October Review Round-Up [20 Nov 2011|03:07pm]

calico_reaction


Here are the reviews posted during October. Please note, this is not a comprehensive list of books I read in October, but rather the books I had the time to review before month's end.

1) Seanan McGuire: One Salt Sea: Couldn't Put It Down
2) Ilona Andrews: On the Edge: Good Read
3) Nancy Kress: Beggars in Spain: It's a Gamble
4) Jo Walton: Tooth and Claw: Excellent
5) Gabrielle Zevin: All These Things I've Done: It's a Gamble
6) Neil Gaiman: Anansi Boys: Excellent
7) Jill Thompson: Delirium's Party: A Little Endless Storybook: Worth Reading, with Reservations
8) Kristen Painter: Blood Rights: Worth Reading, with Reservations
9) Jay Asher & Carolyn Mackler: The Future of Us: It's a Gamble
10) J. Michael Straczynski: Superman: Earth One: Excellent
11) Jo Walton: Farthing: Good Read

As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)
3 comments|post comment

The Liveship Trilogy (Robin Hobb) [15 Nov 2011|09:09pm]

nimoloth
I've just finished Robin Hobb's Liveship trilogy. As with her other books, utterly addictive. I don't know if I could pick a favourite series, but the Rain Wilds ones might still be best I think, for me (Dragon Keeper and Dragon Haven, so far). But these were really good, nonetheless.

As a random aside, these new editions smell. Really bad. Yuck. They need to use different paper, or glue or ink or something.

Anyway... Spoilers for all Tawny Man, Liveship, Dragon Wilds and Farseer books ahead.Collapse )

Next up, Mastiff, the latest Bekka Copper book from Tamora Pierce!!! It has a weird cover - her arm is just not anatomically correct.
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